Volume 7, Number 4 (12-2008)                   JRUMS 2008, 7(4): 251-258 | Back to browse issues page


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Mortazavi S, Nazer M, Sayyadi2 A, Karimi H. The Effect of Microwave Radiation Emitted by Mobile Phones on Human Short Term Memory. JRUMS. 2008; 7 (4) :251-258
URL: http://journal.rums.ac.ir/article-1-518-en.html

Abstract:   (16168 Views)

  The Ef fect of Microwave Radiation Emitted by Mobile Phones on Human Short Term Memory

  

  S.M.J. Mortazavi [1] , M. Nazer [2] , A.R. Sayyadi 2 , H. Karimi [3]

  

  Received: 15/08/07 Sent for Revision: 26/10/08 Received Revised Manuscript: 26/11/08 Accepted: 11/01/09

  

  Background and Objectives : The widespread use of cell phones has made the researchers focus on its health effects. However, the biological effects of electromagnetic fields have not been clearly known.

  Materials and Methods: This interventional study has been performed on 70 male students who were studying at Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences (RUMS) in 2006. Participants were divided into two groups. The First group which included 25 students whose immediate memories were tested by using Wechsler test. Ten minute real/sham exposure intervals to microwave radiations emitted from a mobile phone were performed at 0 h (sham), 24 h (real) and 48 h (sham) and the participants were tested using 5 Wechsler subsets immediately after each real/sham exposure. The second group included 45 males were exposed/ sham exposed to microwave radiation at 0 h (real), 24 h (sham). Data were statistically analyzed using student’s t-test.

  Results: The means of memory scores in both groups were increased in the next day. This clearly shows the role of learning in these tests. No statistical relationship was found between exposure to the microwave radiation and memory scores.

  Conclusion: Overall data could not show a significant effect of the mobile phone on short term memory. Repeating the memory tests after 24, 48 h clearly increased the scores in both groups. These findings confirm the role of learning in memory tests and lack of any link to cell phone use.

  Key words: Mobile Phones, Microwave radiation, Neurologic Effects, Short Term Memory

  

  Funding: This research was funded by the Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences.

  Conflict of interest: All the authors are among editorial board or editorial staff of JRUMS.

  Ethical approval: The Ethics Committee of Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences has approved the study.



 

  [1] - Associate Professor of Medical Physics, Medical School, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, The Center for Radiological Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Iran

  (Corresponding Author) Tel: (0391) 5235480, Fax: (0391) 5235480, E-mail: jamo23@lycos.com

  [2] - Psychology Department, Medical School, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran

  [3] - Medical Student, Medical School, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran

Full-Text [PDF 1391 kb]   (1433 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Research | Subject: Physics
Received: 2009/03/17

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